Category Archives: Workshop Session 2

Sharing through Interaction. Socializing Media for Cultural Heritage Work

Mar Dixon, Cultural and Social Entrepreneur, United Kingdom

Mar Dixon is a well-known social media museum activist, always creating new ways to connect museums to visitors via social media. With a little bit of Search Engine Optimization (but not much!), you will learn how to use social media in the best way for you during the workshop based on #MuseumSelfie, #MuseumWeek, #AskACurator and #LoveTheater’s examples.

Immersed in culture, Mar Dixon has fingers in many pies from the acclaimed #MuseumSelfie still dominating twitter, to the UK MuseoMix, CultureThemes and Museum Camp projects. Mar is an audience development and social media specialist.

Economies of sharing digitized cultural heritage

Georg Hohmann, Head of Deutsches Museum Digital, Deutsches Museum, München
Gertraud Koch, Professor of Cultural Anthropology, University of Hamburg
Mareike Schumacher, eFoto project, University of Hamburg

In the context of digitization many questions emerge around economic issues. Digitization of cultural materials is a cost-intensive matter, reuse of cultural materials by creative industries seems to promise some returns of invest, and the symbolic capital of sharing cultural materials turns out to be an important asset. Moreover, in economies creating added value increasingly through knowledge and cultural production, as currently given, the question is apparent how the cultural sector may benefit from these gains.

However, so far we can hardly find information about economic issues of digitizing and sharing cultural materials. How can digitisation and sharing of cultural heritage materials be funded? What peculiarities do diverse funding sources provide?  What kinds of costs need to be considered in the workflow of sharing cultural materials? What kinds of outcomes are expected from sharing cultural materials? Can there be an economic gain? What can be gained from sharing cultural materials under the creative commons licenses? Are there business models for sharing cultural materials?

The workshop will collect and sort out the knowledge about the economies of sharing digitized cultural materials and what questions need to be inquired for facilitating  approaches of sharing as caring.

Sharing and Creating Knowledge: Crowdsourcing at the ETH Library in Zurich

Nicole Graf, Head of the Image Archive of the ETH library in Zurich

Following the successful crowdsourcing project involving Swissair retirees (2009-2013), ETH-Bibliothek installed a generally accessible comments function on its image database at the end of 2015. By January 2017, around 750 different volunteers (90 per cent men) were involved in crowdsourcing and almost 11,500 images have been improved or even identified for the first time. The workshop will give an insight on the key factors for a successful crowdsourcing campaign and introduce the tools how to get to know more about your crowd’s motivation and their background.

Step by Step: Ways Towards Open Access

Karin Glasemann, Digital Coordinator, Nationalmuseum Sweden
Antje Theise, Rare Book Librarian, Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Hamburg

The workshop focusses on:

–          How to reach a decision in favor of Open Access.

When the Nationalmuseum started publishing its collections on Europeana, it did so with a restricted license. What happened, which discussions were necessary to change that policy? What can you learn from our experience?

–          How do you start being open without a lot of money?

An argument brought up mostly against changing access policies is the high upfront costs for changing infrastructure and presentation of data. We will show how you team up with powerful collaborators like Europeana and Wikimedia/Wikidata in order to open up your material and to boost the internal development

–          Benefits of Open Access

Even small steps can return great results! Our pilot has been proven right by the extremely positive feedback, but also by a lot of innovative engagement with our collections without us being able to invest a lot of time in these activities.

We will give input through our experiences but want to discuss all challenges employees can face when trying to change their institutions policy. We want the participants to go home not only with a set of arguments for promoting open access in their home institution, but with a clear picture of where and with what kind of pilot they could start right after the conference.