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Sharing is Caring 2015: Right to Remix?

Sharing is Caring: Right to Remix? was held 2 October 2015 in the DR Concert Hall in Copenhagen.

The DR Concert Hall. Photo by Lars Lundqvist, CC BY-NC-SA
The DR Concert Hall. Photo by Lars Lundqvist, CC BY-NC-SA

#sharecare15
#righttoremix

Sharing is Caring: Right to Remix? addressed the topic of remix culture and rights, and how the cultural heritage sector can deal with these in constructive and proactive ways.

Watch videos from the seminar

See photos from the seminar

Through a versatile programme of international keynote speakers, keynotes in conversation and ignite sessions, the seminar focused on the amazing stuff the cultural sector can achieve when rethinking the logic of copyright in a digital age perspective. But we also discussed the hurdles to overcome and the fights to take, when we want to challenge the traditional notion of copyright.

The speakers delivered talks to open up fresh perspectives on how to work more flexibly with rights in the digital age, and what awesome potentials the cultural sector can tap into if we dare to change our existing mindsets and ways of working.

As a special feature this year, Sharing is Caring led directly up to the annual cultural heritage hackathon Hack4DK from Friday evening 2 October through Sunday 4 October.

SPEAKERS

Keynote speaker Melissa Terras

Melissa Terras, Professor of Digital Humanities UCL
Melissa Terras, Professor of Digital Humanities UCL 

Read the blogposts that Melissa based her keynote on.

Taking, Making and Law-Breaking: copyright, digitised content, and the digital maker movement.

In this talk, Melissa Terras will talk about her experiences in trying to reuse digitized heritage content to make something she likes, wants, and will use – and the frustrating barriers she encountered along the way.  Covering issues of technical digitization standards, search and retrieval issues, and licensing issues, it is demonstrated how difficult it is to reuse cultural heritage content in this context, given the implicit and explicit barriers raised, institutionally, technically, and legally, along the way.

Melissa Terras is Director of UCL Centre for Digital Humanities, Professor of Digital Humanities in UCL’s Department of Information Studies, and Vice Dean of Research (Projects) in UCL’s Faculty of Arts and Humanities. With a background in Classical Art History, English Literature, and Computing Science, her doctorate (Engineering, University of Oxford) examined how to use advanced information engineering technologies to interpret and read Roman texts. Publications include “Image to Interpretation: Intelligent Systems to Aid Historians in the Reading of the Vindolanda Texts” (2006, Oxford University Press) and “Digital Images for the Information Professional” (2008, Ashgate) and she has co-edited various volumes such as “Digital Humanities in Practice” (Facet 2012) and “Defining Digital Humanities: A Reader” (Ashgate 2013). She is currently serving on the Board of Curators of the University of Oxford Libraries, and the Board of the National Library of Scotland. Her research focuses on the use of computational techniques to enable research in the arts and humanities that would otherwise be impossible. You can generally find her on twitter @melissaterras.

Keynote speaker Maarten Zeinstra

Maarten Zeinstra, advisor at Kennisland
Maarten Zeinstra, advisor at Kennisland

Caring for the limits of sharing

If the cultural heritage sector wants to support a thriving Remix Culture, we need to debate the legal and technical mechanisms that are holding artists and institutions back from sharing. We need a frank discussion on the merits of sharing vs. the monopoly of intellectual property rights.

Maarten Zeinstra works at Kennisland (KL). KL is an independent think tank with a public mission. KL aspires to strengthen our knowledge society by designing innovative programmes and realising interventions to address the grand challenges of today’s society. A strong knowledge-driven society subsists because of access to information. By making digital heritage collections available in an open and innovative way, knowledge can thrive.
Maarten is advisor on copyright law and open technology in the cultural sector. His focus is to guide cultural institutions in making data available online. In practice, this means writing policy, giving workshops and masterclasses, and guiding technological development. Maarten is project lead of Creative Commons Nederland and has extensive experience as a requirements engineer and architect for projects like Open Images, Europeana and OutOfCopyright.eu.

Keynote speaker Eva Van Passel

Eva van Passel, researcher at Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Eva van Passel, researcher at Vrije Universiteit Brussel

How open is open enough? A philosophy of cultural commons for the cultural heritage sector.

Cultural (heritage) institutions are redefining their roles in a context of digital access to culture. This talk will address how the cultural heritage sector can adopt a layered approach, with different degrees of openness. An overall goal of cultural heritage institutions in the digital age can be to provide as much access as possible and to be as open as possible towards reuse and remix practices. How open this is, however, might change depending on specific user communities, and it can also be different depending on the content being shared.

Eva Van Passel has been a researcher at iMinds – SMIT, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, since 2007. Her research interests include the many challenges and opportunities for arts and heritage in a networked society, but her research mainly focuses on the changing roles of cultural (heritage) institutions in the context of digitisation, digital preservation, and distribution and sustainable digital access. Topics under scrutiny over the years have included strategic challenges for cultural institutions, digital cultural policy, audience strategies, business models, the European digital library Europeana, open cultural data and open GLAM initiatives, and financing models for digital cultural heritage. Eva holds Masters degrees in Communication and Media Studies, and in Film Studies and Visual Culture.

Keynote speaker: Cédric Manara

Cédric Manara, copyright counsel, Google
Cédric Manara, copyright counsel, Google

Copyright and the 99%

Historically, copyright has been concerned with encouraging commercial cultural production. Today, most of the creative expression comes from amateurs who do not understand copyright, or have no clue what it’s about. What about tomorrow? The Internet, with its 2.8 billion users and counting, is just beginning to change the legal landscape. How to reform copyright – in Denmark or in Europe – to reconcile the interests of those who want to make money, when others just want to share knowledge or information?

Cédric Manara, PhD, has lost his hair teaching, writing or consulting. He has been a full time law professor at EDHEC Business School (France) and held visitorships in Finland, Italy, Japan and the USA, published a lot on intellectual property and internet legal issues, and also was a consultant for e-commerce companies or law firms. He joined Google’s wonderful legal team as copyright counsel in 2013.

PANEL DEBATE: CREATIVE COMMONS FOR CONTEMPORARY ART?

A terrific panel of artists, copyright experts, and museum people in a debate about contemporary art, digital media, and rights issues.

In this debate, we discussed perspectives and challenges in using Creative Commons licenses on contemporary art, as opposed to traditional copyright. Does it entail increased visibility for artists if they share reproductions of their work more liberally than copyright allows for? Is it even possible for artists to opt out of social media today, if they want their work to known more widely? Are there new ways for artists to make revenues in connection with more openly licensed images of their work? Or is it a slippery slope to start relaxing the restrictions on how images of artworks are shown, shared and circulated online?

The aim was to have a constructive and solution-oriented debate that will help artists and cultural institutions alike to better understand how to navigate and benefit from the participatory culture on the Internet, while respecting rights.
The panel

IT lawyer Martin von Haller Grønbæk, Bird & Bird, will moderate the debate.

Speaker: Harry Verwayen

Deputy Director, Europeana

A GLAM toolbox for assessing impact

Harry Verwayen will give an overview of the state-of the art of ‘impact’ thinking in our sector ranging from the theoretical to the very practical day to day application of it. You will get an insight in impact as a useful concept, the tools and methodologies that have been developed to design, assess and narrate impact, and practical examples of institutions that have used this methodology to their advantage, like Europeana and SMK Open.

Learn more about the impact toolbox

About Harry Verwayen
Harry Verwayen is the Deputy Director of Europeana. He is responsible for making sure that the organisation meets its objectives, and do it well. What he likes to do more than anything else though is to design and implement new business models that will change our way of thinking about heritage as an enabler of societal and economic growth. Lately, much of his attention and effort is directed towards the developments of the sharing economy. A visual thinker, he needs a white board as much as a strong coffee.

Speaker: Rob Stein

Chief Program Officer, American Alliance of Museums

Can the cultural sector really change lives?

For those of us working in galleries, libraries, archives, and museums, we believe that answer to be a resounding yes. However, demonstrating this impact – beyond anecdotal evidence – has proven to be devilishly hard. Why is that the case?

While the cultural sector has progressed significantly to adopt technology that can exhibit collections, engage audiences, and document histories – have we missed the chance to prove why those things are important in the first place? As support for culture seems to be under continual threat, galleries, libraries, archives, and museums must leverage these technical skills to deliver measurable social impact lest we risk being sidelined as recreational, superficial, and optional.

Let’s explore together the ways that cultural organizations can advance our work in this area and document the proof of change we see every day.

About Rob Stein
Robert Stein is a museum leader, technology expert, and strategist with deep experience in the museum field heading up innovative projects and diverse teams. In April 2016, Rob joined the American Alliance of Museums as the Executive Vice President and Chief Program Officer to lead the organization’s programming efforts in service to both national and global audiences. In that role, Stein is responsible for key strategic initiatives including the expansion of the Alliance’s role as a thought leader, content provider, and global catalyst for excellence in the field of museums.

Rob is a sought after author, speaker, and consultant, focusing on the impact museums can have in their community, how technology efforts can change the dynamic of museum innovation, and how metrics and measurement can drive continuous improvement for the practice of museums.

Stein is active in service to the museum field having served as a board member of the Museum Computer Network, an active member of the International Program Committee of Museums and the Web, and as a National Advisor to the Education Committee of AAM. He is currently a Senior Advisor to the National Center for Arts Research at Southern Methodist University.

Speaker: Marie Østergaard

Dokk1 – Building on a Burning Platform

Dokk1 – Aarhus’ new main library – opened in June 2015. The talk will focus on Dokk1 as a result of many years of prototyping, design thinking, testing, researching and a highly inclusive process as well as discuss how Dokk1 has become an example of what can come from the emergent necessity of rethinking spaces, services and community engagement. Working intensely with involvement of a massive amount of new and non-traditional partnerships on all levels of the organization in order to develop new service designs and events, space praxis has been redefined. Through user involvement the identity and spaces in Dokk1 have changed our library identity forever. It has turned the library into a city square, with all the transparency, diversity and mutual ownership that follows such a change.

About Marie Østergaard
Marie is Head of Community Engagement, Partnerships and Communication of Dokk1. Since 2001, she has been part of Aarhus Public Libraries’ development of the physical library of the future. Focusing on interactions, user-involvement, network-development, prototyping and communication in the physical library space, Aarhus has investigated new technologies, involvement processes and learning. In a wide range of projects and processes with users, network and partners she has focused on the development of the “next library” – the library of the future. From 2005, Marie was the project leader of the building of Dokk1, implementing and developing these ideas as well as introducing new forms of user- and citizen involvement in the planning and building of Dokk1. Marie is also part of Ineli – International Network of Emerging Library Innovators.

Sharing is Caring is spreading

Sharing is Caring is all about sharing experience and expertise about digital culture.

This year, we are thrilled to announce that the concept of Sharing is Caring is spreading across borders. Good colleagues in the Hamburg cultural sector are organising the first ever extension of Sharing is Caring outside Denmark!

The conference in Denmark remains the big core event which takes place every second year, each time with a new topical theme. In November 2017, we will meet in Aarhus under the headline Digitisation and social impact?

As of 2017, you can have a share in the Sharing is Caring name and organize your own local extension, to address the topics that are close to your heart and community. This is what our friends in Hamburg are doing in April 2017.

Interested in staging your own Sharing is Caring event?
Get in touch!

The relation between the Sharing is Caring conference and extensions is inspired by the one between the TED conferences and local TEDx extensions. That is why the extensions use the hashtag #sharecarex

Stay tuned about the core conference at #sharecare17 and the Hamburg extension at #sharecarex


Damen Pyramide, from the photographic collection of the MKG Hamburg, Public Domain

Speaker: Tim Sherratt

Access is never simply ‘open’

It’s a struggle for meaning, power, and value. I’m interested in using digital tools to see collections differently, to create opportunities for reflection and resistance. From Australia’s racist immigration policies, to the encroachments of state surveillance, I’ll be exploring how digital access changes the types of questions we can ask of the past.

About Tim Sherratt
Tim Sherratt is a historian and hacker who researches the possibilities and politics of digital cultural collections. Tim has worked across the cultural heritage sector and has been developing online resources relating to libraries, archives, museums and history since 1993. He’s currently Associate Professor of Digital Heritage at the University of Canberra. Tim’s tools and experiments include important things like The Real Face of White Australia, useful things like QueryPic, and strange things like The Vintage Face Depot. You can find him at timsherratt.org or as @wragge on Twitter.

Picture © Christopher Brothers 2012 

Keynote: Elizabeth Merritt

GLAMS in a Digital Future

Times of rapid change challenge organizations to revisit the assumptions underlying their existing practices. Some companies thrive by reinventing their business models while others fail to understand how their strengths align with new opportunities. GLAMs (Galeries, Libraries, Archives, Museums)—as individual organizations and as a sector—need to examine how the rise of open, digital culture may transform the core value they offer to society.

About Elizabeth Merritt
Vice President, Strategic Foresight and Founding Director, Center for the Future of Museums, at the American Alliance of Museums

Believing that museums can change the world, Elizabeth Merritt is devoted to helping museums create a brighter future for their communities. As founding director of the American Alliance of Museums’ Center for the Future of Museums, she applies the tools of strategic foresight to the nonprofit realm. Ms. Merritt conducts trends forecasting and scenario development for museums, sharing her work through publications, social media and presentations. She is the author of CFM’s annual TrendsWatch report and produces the weekly e-newsletter Dispatches from the Future of Museums. She frequently keynotes at conferences in the US and abroad. In recent years, her work has expanded to encompass libraries, orchestras and opera as well. Elizabeth earned has her B.S. from Yale and an M.A. in cell and molecular biology from Duke University, as well as training in futures studies at the University of Houston.